August 20th

Here’s a final update for yall on my Eighthinch chromo sprocket! I’ve been running this little guy for about nine months now and don’t have a bad thing to report. Here’s a few photos and a little write up so you can peep these before you buy one! Click through for the full review and flicks…

Weight: Milled out just about as much as possible without compromising integrity. I really should have weighed this before putting it on but then again I don’t really care about grams (these come in at 120 for the 25t) and all that. Just know that these sprockets are plenty light enough compared to a similar alloy counterparts.

Strength: After plenty of grinds, gaps and bike tosses this thing isn’t showing any signs of wear. Its definitely been bashed on a few ledges in the past nine months but is still rolling straight as ever! One thing I worried about with a sprocket that has no insert is the integrity of the 48 splines that hook up to the spindle. With the variety of inserted splined sprockets on the market I’ve either witnessed or experienced first hand some major slippage on a bunch of them. Turns out this solid bit was a proper solution to that problem and hasn’t shown a single sign of budging.

Price: They’re only $40. Duh. That’s pretty cheap.

Materials and Wear: Usually I start to notice some pretty decent wear on the valleys and one side of the teeth on my sprockets. This ones electronically dipped, full 4130 and milled out to be slim yet functional. As you can see in the pics there’s little wear at all from my chain.

Sizing: I’m running a 33t with a 12t Eighthinch cog in the rear. Odds are you can find a size in the Eighthinch chromo sprocket to fit your needs. These come in 25, 28, 33, 36, and 39t so you can find something yo work for everything from commuting and tarking to running a micro setup on your FGFS bike. Eighthinch has you covered.

Verdict: This is hands down the best sprocket I’ve ridden. The only reason I see myself swapping this thing out is for a smaller size if I go micro drive!